February 2011

"German Guy"

In a refreshing contrast to this season's haphazard moralizing, this week's episode was a solid return to form. It had high points of all sorts (although I don't think any of them topped Stan's baby legs on American Dad).

The episode begins with the entire family bemoaning Chris' incessant masturbation, which has rendered all of the fabrics in his room stiff to the point of shattering. ("I'm pretty sure our washing machine is pregnant," Lois says. "I don't even know how that's scientifically possible.")

Family Guy ist mein Führer!

How do they get away with this stuff?

Leave it to Family Guy to create hilarious situations using the most evil man this side of Attila: Adolf Hitler.  I think it’s amazing that the show can create such comedy using a character that has the ability to offend almost every human being.  Including Hitler and the Nazis in the show is nothing new or random.  It has happened in numerous episodes. 

Family Guy Revolution

"Take that you lousy Brits!"

The spirit of an oppressed people can be relit, generations after the flames of indignity have been extinguished.  Throughout the production of Family Guy, Peter has shown an inability to get along with the English.  Being from the land of the American Revolution, disagreeing with the British is in Peter Griffin’s heritage.  Furthermore, the show portrays them as “silly nannies”, depicting British men as over-the-top, effeminate, and whiney.  The British are not just random victims of the show’s sarcasm.  There’s a reason behind it, which most New Englanders probably already know.

"He's a Phony!"

Brian, not Peter

 

Brian seems to come off like a pretty cool guy.  I mean, he initially appears laid back and down to earth.  However, throughout the tenure of the show, Brian has repeatedly shown to be full of… it.  He appears to be very moral in thought and action, but time and time again, we are shown that it is not completely genuine.  He drives a Prius, distrusts Big Business, won’t use air conditioning, and so on.  Well, everything looks in order here. Let’s dig a little deeper.  He fights for civil rights. That’s pretty noble.  He hates Fox News…okay, who doesn’t?  He has an uncontrollable urge to bark at African Americans.

What?!

Brian's Novel

Brian's novel has been a running gag since the earliest days of the show. For years the gag was that Brian, ever the earnest intellectual, was perpetually working on his novel, which he wouldn't let anyone else read. I'm sure I'm not the only person who secretly suspected that it was just 300 pages of "woof woof bark, cats suck" or some such dog-like nonsense.

Stewie's bit about Brian's novel ("Some friends become enemies? Enemies become friends?"), where he keeps asking questions while tilting his head farther and making his voice higher, was used at least twice. To anyone who has been plagued by an eternally unfinished novelist, these jokes were comedy gold.

"Friends of Peter G"

You would never expect a show like Family Guy to get preachy and moralistic. Much less to get preachy and moralistic and then pull its punches at the last second. But here we are.

This will no doubt go down in history as "the alcoholism episode" or "the AA episode." How strange that in its ninth season, the show is leaning more and more towards single-subject episodes. And what strange episodes they choose!

This is also another of those rare (though increasingly less so) Family Guy episodes without a secondary or tertiary plot. It's Peter and Brian all the way, with everyone else essentially being relegated to the role of scenery.

Peter's Hot Dog Car

Family Guy and Sigmund Freud

 

Sometimes Family Guy is saying a lot more than it seems.  In the episode “And the Weiner is”, Peter is showing some disturbed behavior when he buys the long red car.  This is actually directly referencing the work of Sigmund Freud.  I don’t think being featured in the off-color show would bother the doctor.  In fact, I think he would be a fan.  He and the writers seem to think alike.

 

Peter's Hot Dog Car

Family Guy and Sigmund Freud

 

Sometimes Family Guy is saying a lot more than it seems.  In the episode “And the Weiner is”, Peter is showing some disturbed behavior when he buys the long red car.  This is actually directly referencing the work of Sigmund Freud.  I don’t think being featured in the off-color show would bother the doctor.  In fact, I think he would be a fan.  He and the writers both seem to think alike.

 

In Addition to Everything Else, she's got B.O.

Meg's role in the show.

 

Meg Griffin has an unfortunate, yet interesting place on Family Guy.  Few characters in the show like her, and it seems her creators don’t either.  She’s become an easy joke for the show’s writers, and they always come at her expense.  Peter has no interest in her, much like Louis.  Chris likes to draw her with a pig’s body.  Stewie finds her repulsive.  Her stuffed animals even ran away from her.  In fact, the whole town seems to not like her.

Buddy Cianci Jr. High School

Do you know why this name is so funny?

 

 

Recall the Family Guy episode “Mr. Griffin goes to Washington”, in which Peter Griffin becomes a lobbyist for the El Dorado Cigarette Company.  Family Guy’s depiction of both lobbyists and politicians was hilarious.  The way that Peter convinced the politicians to support his cause by simply egging them on with two words “Come on…” was hilarious (his cause, by the way, was promoting cigarettes to children).   I imagine these two words becoming his catch phrase if Peter was routinely in the public spotlight.  While Seth MacFarlane may not portray this scenario, it isn’t necessary.  The voting public of Providence, R.I. has shown they are as easily swayed as the politicians portrayed in the show.

"Nobody Messes with Adam We!"

Adam West as Adam West

              Adam West's self-played character is one of the more dynamic characters on Family Guy.  His off-the-wall thought process and inexplicable reactions create one of the show’s funniest contributors, although West manages to display this humor in a direct, yet subtle manner.  This is possible because he plays a character that he has been refining for many years: that of himself, or more precisely, Adam West.